The Power of Green Bringing Your Building Up to Speed

For the past couple of decades, interest in the environment and "greening" of residential buildings has been creeping into our daily lexicon; nowadays, the theories have become practice, and renewable or "green" power is now more accessible than ever before. With planning and guidance, just about any building can inject a little environmentally friendly, money-saving green into its daily operations.

General interest in green power usually falls into one of three categories: A consumer has heard about green power, but now, with instability in the Middle East and rising fuel prices, they're really interested in using green power in their home.

The second group is made up of managers and directors whose building energy costs are becoming so unpredictable, their energy budget falls apart by mid-year. These administrators need to present a price stability strategy to their board and shareholders for, at minimum, the company's annual electricity cost. Finally, there's the building that wants to attract a new breed of co-op or condo buyers - those motivated by environmental issues like clean air, and less pollution. These individuals and boards want to build a green image and create a green marketing campaign for their property.

Renewable Energy

Regardless of the reason for one's interest in green power, some important background information should come first. Green power is electricity that is generated by renewable energy sources such as wind, solar photovoltaics, biomass (using plant compost or waste as fuel), low-impact hydro, geothermal, and ocean power. "Renewable" means sustainable, or regenerating - as opposed to the fossil fuels that are being depleted and are not renewable. Green power from renewable generators is available to New Yorkers and to over 50 percent of retail customers nationwide. As more consumers buy green power, more renewable generation is developed.

A question that commonly surfaces in discussions of green power is, can we get enough green power to support this market? If we look at wind generation only, the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) claims that with the existing infrastructure and U.S. wind resources, 20 percent of our electricity could be generated by wind. And, if intense wind areas like North Dakota get transmission improvements, wind could generate more than 33 percent of our country's electricity - and that's just wind alone.

Read More...

Related Articles

New York City Buildings Say Goodbye to No. 6 Heating Oil

100 Percent Phaseout Complete

Creating a Greener New York City

Planning for a Sustainable Future

The Green Market

Affordable Green Energy Options for Your Association

Power-Up with Co-Generation

A Look at our Next Generation’s Technology

The Green Movement

Conservation and Savings for Residential Buildings

Submetering for Savings

What You Need to Know

 

Comments

  • As a source for Reusable Home Improvement Projects in the South Bronx readers should consider saving some energy and money through ReBuilders Source. ReBuilders Source is a discount retailer cooperative of surplus and used building materials. ReBuilders Source is a worker-owned cooperative looking to make a difference in our community both socially and environmentally. We are the first worker-owned building materials and reuse center, a self-sustained cooperative and alternative source of building materials. ReBuilders Source is community based, deep rooted in the heart of the South Bronx; part of our mission is to make the South Bronx a safer place. The workers are individuals living in the Bronx who have a heart for social improvement and justice through hard work. ReBuilders Source is a green business since our products are re-used or surplus. We offer high quality products at affordable prices for contractors, landlords, homeowners and do-it your-selfers. The cooperative has a positive impact on our environment something of relevance for the preservation and quality of our community’s natural resources, consequently having a positive global environmental impact.