Answering Westchester's Questions The Westchester Cooperative and Condominium Advisory Council

Westchester County is known for, among other things, its grand, multi-million dollar mansions and historic homes found in its posh communities such as Scarsdale, Bronxville and Brewster. Many of these homes were built in the 1950s, when the economy was prosperous. That decade, World War II veterans returned to the job market and started families. To answer the need for more housing for these new families, many high-rise apartments, single-family homes and duplexes were also built. Westchester’s website, www.westchestergov.com, coins it as “a new era of suburbanization” for the American family.

Fast forward two decades to the 1970s and 1980s: Rental units weren’t profitable, so to encourage individual ownership of the apartments, some of the rental housing was converted to cooperatives. In 1979, the Cooperative and Condominium Advisory Council (CCAC) was formed to serve as a resource for elected board members of cooperatives and condominiums in Westchester.

“There was no entity available to represent the interests of homeowners who are not single-family homeowners,” says Ken Finger, chief counsel of the CCAC.

Today, the CCAC represents more than 400 cooperatives and condominiums in the Westchester and Mid-Hudson Region. It is a component organization of the Building and Realty Institute of Westchester and the Mid-Hudson Region (BRI). The BRI is one of New York state’s largest building, realty and construction industry membership organizations. Formed in 1946, the association is recognized as a leading force in the building and realty industry and has more than 1,700 members in 14 counties of New York State. The BRI consistently monitors issues that affect apartment rental properties, co-ops and condos, and property managers.

Weighing the decision to create a separate council for Westchester and the Mid-Hudson region instead of joining collaborative forces with New York City’s council was, according to Finger, like comparing apples and oranges.

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11 Comments

  • Can you tell me how many Co-Ops are in Westchester County only?
  • What is the status of the current negotiations? It is beyond my belief that this union may be striking at this time when they should be grateful they have a job with the good benefits that have. Somebody doesn't know what the value of gratefullness is.
  • I have a coop in West Harrison NY which i have had on the market for over a yr A lovely couple wished to buy it , and did all of the proper things including getting a mortgage. They were denied by the board without even being interviewed. They were financially solvent etc. I was told to 'call" the management company if there were questions. The selling attorney, the realator,and i received no call backs. In fact the bylaws apparently say that a buyer can be rejected without reason. I am enraged. I know that there are over 20 units with lock boxes wanting to sell. I am not in a position to fight with this board as my health has not been well. Are there any optionIs for me and others in my situation? Thank you
  • what are the rules governing portable generators in a coop. seems they are to dangerous to be used by individual shareholders.
  • is it ethical for board president to allow a print endorsement on the maangement company's website?
  • @unknown, I'm not sure why it would be unethical to have a print endorsement from a Board president on a management company's website. So long as there was no preferential treatment and nothing that was illegal was exchanged (kick-backs, fees, etc.) this is merely an opinion of the management company's services from a client.
  • Is it ethical for the treasurer of a small co-op to hire his daughter-in-law as bookkeeper over the objection of another owner?
  • Do not under any circumstances buy a coop. You will regret it!
  • I have had my coop in New Rochelle, NY on the market off and on for the past five years. A few moths ago I received and offer and shortly afterwards a back-up offer. The management company took there sweet time getting the bank's appraiser the documentation he needed to finish his appraisal. Shortly after the potential buyer received a mortgage, the board rejected him and refused to interview him. This gentleman had 43,000 in the bank, no DEBT at all, good credit and a good job. If he doesn't qualify who will? I also lost my back up offer because the process took so long. I called the attorney general office and I was told that the board can do whatever they want and that if they wanted to refuse every buyer I presented they could. This is modern day slavery. These coop boards are playing God. They should be mandated to at least give a conditional approval so that sellers and buyers don't waste their time and hundreds and thousands of dollars just to be rejected. This system is so backwards. It is hard enough to sell a coop. What makes me even more angry is that I believe the board did this for spite because I disputed a recent charge on my maintenance bill :-(
  • I have had my coop in New Rochelle, NY on the market off and on for the past five years. A few moths ago I received and offer and shortly afterwards a back-up offer. The management company took there sweet time getting the bank's appraiser the documentation he needed to finish his appraisal. Shortly after the potential buyer received a mortgage, the board rejected him and refused to interview him. This gentleman had 43,000 in the bank, no DEBT at all, good credit and a good job. If he doesn't qualify who will? I also lost my back up offer because the process took so long. I called the attorney general office and I was told that the board can do whatever they want and that if they wanted to refuse every buyer I presented they could. This is modern day slavery. These coop boards are playing God. They should be mandated to at least give a conditional approval so that sellers and buyers don't waste their time and hundreds and thousands of dollars just to be rejected. This system is so backwards. It is hard enough to sell a coop. What makes me even more angry is that I believe the board did this for spite because I disputed a recent charge on my maintenance bill :-(
  • Hi - my Co-op Apt. Is for Sale in New Rochelle? I have listed it with a Realtor and it is in MLS? I guess I can't give it to another Realtor until contract expire Soon? It's in The Courtyard Manor, 210 Pelham Road. They are not bringing me much traffic? I don't know what top down?