Attractive Reuse New and Easy Ways to Encourage Recycling in Your Condo and Co-op

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One would be hard-pressed in 2017 to find a person who would argue that recycling is a bad thing. Even with portions of the population questioning the reality of climate change, recycling paper, metal, and glass is an action of almost universally-acknowledged virtue at this point. But regardless of one's politics or personal habits, recycling in New York City is mandatory. The Department of Sanitation requires residential owners and landlords to designate a specific and accessible area for recyclables, post explainers with necessary information, and ensure that residents are aware of what is required.

That said, people are people, and corners do get cut. Should anyone peruse through any trash can or garbage bin (not a recommendation), they're likely to find the errant can, glass bottle, cardboard box, etc. The city can only be so vigilant when it comes to policing an entire city's recycling habits. Thus, in condos and co-ops, it falls to the board and fellow residents to encourage each other to consider Mother Earth and put waste where it belongs.

Fortunately, this has only gotten easier, thanks to city programs and technologies that promote simple and straightforward sorting.

Trash

In many a condo or co-op property, each floor has a garbage room with a trash chute and various bins into which residents are expected to sort their recycling. While this is not overly complicated to begin with, it can still be made simpler.

Tower Recycling Systems, a company based in Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey, provides technology to high-rises in the tri-state area that offers the garbage chute – once exclusively used for waste disposal – an all-purpose upgrade.

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