Changing SoHo Artful Living South of Houston

 Today’s SoHo is synonymous with world class dining, prestigious art galleries, chic  clothing stores, luxury boutique hotels, trendy lounges, picturesque cobble  stone streets and stunning cast iron architecture.  

 The Lower Manhattan neighborhood SoHo is shorthand for South of Houston, the  first official acronym given to a New York City neighborhood. Others eventually followed, NoHo (North of Houston), Tribeca (Triangle below  Canal Street) and Dumbo (Down under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass.)  

 The neighborhood stretches roughly from Canal Street to Houston Street and lies  between the Hudson River and Lafayette Street. Nearby neighborhoods include  Greenwich Village, Tribeca, Little Italy and Chinatown.  

 SoHo has a colorful past and rich history and the area has undergone extreme  changes.  

 Radical Transformations

 In the 1700s’ SoHo was subdivided into sprawling farms. Broome Street, between Thompson and  Greene Streets were covered with trees and peppered with rolling hills and  streams. Beekman’s swamp (yes, a swamp) encircled Spring Street, and Bayard’s Mount (named after Nicholas Bayard, the 16th mayor of New York City) was the  highest point in Manhattan, located west of Broome Street.  

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