Long Beach The City by the Sea

 Imagine a quiet oceanfront community with powdery, white sand beaches, wonderful  restaurants, a thriving cultural scene, and all of this less than an hour away  from Midtown New York City. Look no further than Long Beach.  

 Long Beach is a city in Nassau County located on a namesake island, which forms  part of the Outer Barrier off Long Island's South Shore. The city is surrounded  by Reynolds Channel to the north, east and west, and the Atlantic Ocean to the  south..  

 Long Beach's Past

 Long Beach's first inhabitants were the Algonquian-speaking Rockaway Indians,  who sold the area to English colonists in 1643. While the barrier island was  used by baymen and farmers, no one lived there year-round for more than two  centuries. In 1849 Congress established a lifesaving station after 62 people  perished when the barque Mexico, carrying Irish immigrants to New York, ran  ashore on New Year's Day.  

 Austin Corbin, a builder from Brooklyn, was first to attempt to develop the  island as a resort. He formed a partnership with the Long Island Rail Road  (LIRR) to finance the New York and Long Beach Railroad Co., which laid track  from Lynbrook to Long Beach in 1880. That same year, Corbin opened Long Beach  Hotel, a row of 27 cottages along an 1,100-foot strip of beach, which he  claimed as the world's largest hotel. In its first season, the railroad brought  300,000 visitors to Long Island. On July 29, 1907, a fire broke out at the Long  Beach Hotel and burned it to the ground.  

 In 1906, William Reynolds, a 39-year-old former state senator and real estate  developer, entered the picture. Reynolds had already developed four Brooklyn  neighborhoods (Bedford-Stuyvesant, Borough Park, Bensonhurst and South  Brownsville) and Coney Island's Dreamland, the world's largest amusement park.  He gathered investors, acquired the oceanfront from private owners and the rest  of the island from the Town of Hempstead in 1907 and planned to build a  boardwalk, homes and hotels.  

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