National Association for Community Mediation Reconciling Conflicts in Your Co-op or Condo

Unless you live in the perfectly utopian condo or co-op (in which case please disclose where), conflict is virtually inevitable. Whether is it a noise complaint or larger issue of governance, disputes between neighbors and board members will arise yet are fortunately resolvable. However, because many communities have a difficult time conciliating conflict, many residents and boards are looking to outside mediation to help negotiate the problem more effectively, with less dirty looks and cat fights involved. Organizations such as the National Association for Community Mediation (NAFCM) and the Peace Institute in Manhattan focus on promoting and utilizing specific resolution strategies with trained professionals to help solve and mitigate conflicts not only in condo and co-op communities, but also between family members, employees and significant others.

NAFCM

NAFCM is a national organization based in Mesa, Arizona, that supports and promotes a network of more than 400 local mediation centers, such as the Peace Institute. It focuses on providing the latest mediation training, program administration resources, and locating funding. NAFCM also promotes collaborative projects between mediation centers, endorses mediation research, and educates on the benefits and effectiveness of using mediation as opposed to other, more common yet less effective tactics, such as banging on your neighbor's ceiling with a broomstick.

NAFCM was founded in 1994 by a group of individuals who were the executive directors of their local community mediation programs. The aim was to create an overarching organization that would oversee and unite local programs. While mediation was a fairly utilized method at the time, programs were sparse and lacked cohesion and unity.

“It was a pretty isolated field,” says Justin Corbett, executive director at NAFCM. “At the time, [mediators] were looking at a specific tree standing on the street. There wasn't really an organization that was looking at the forest as a whole, how the field of mediation was developing, what sort of resources could be shared with one another.”

Structurally, NAFCM is a member-based organization that does not administer mediation services but instead provides support and resources for local community programs, who are members of NAFCM. These centers offer a wide variety of mediation services for over 100 different types of conflicts, including disagreement in condos and co-ops. All centers are able to assist with housing based conflict but 87% have specific programs tailored toward landlord-tenant disputes and 63% have programming particularly designed for condominiums and HOAs, Corbett says.

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3 Comments

  • Helpful and informative . Can you suggest a outlline that could be used to mediate disputes?
  • Yet, I'm so wary that this is merely a rtceaion to the record low interest rates. Who's buying?? Is it investors? First-time? If it's investors, what's the cap rate? I don't think we can rejoice that prices and transactions are rising without a lot more data. We still have a home ownership rate significantly above historic averages, and an aging population that will be downsizing for quite some time to come. I fear that the low rates are causing investors to jump on the bandwagon, only to find that they've paid too much for their investment (a continuing bubble)
  • Yet, I'm so wary that this is merely a rtceaion to the record low interest rates. Who's buying?? Is it investors? First-time? If it's investors, what's the cap rate? I don't think we can rejoice that prices and transactions are rising without a lot more data. We still have a home ownership rate significantly above historic averages, and an aging population that will be downsizing for quite some time to come. I fear that the low rates are causing investors to jump on the bandwagon, only to find that they've paid too much for their investment (a continuing bubble)