Pet Problems Following and Enforcing Pet Rules

 Just take a walk around the streets and parks of the city, and it’s easy to see that New Yorkers love their pets. But not everyone loves animals,  of course—and this can be problematic when it comes to a board deciding if pets should be  permitted in their building.  

 “Boards allow pets because many shareholders and unit owners want pets,” says Lynn Whiting, director of management for The Argo Corporation, a  Manhattan-based residential property management firm. “It's a quality of life issue, and of course many board members are animal  lovers/pet owners themselves. Many owners may have specifically decided on  purchasing in a particular co-op or condo because it is pet-friendly.”  

 Although the data isn't officially kept, many real estate agents in the city  estimate that about 50 percent of the co-ops and condos in New York City are  pet-friendly. Yet every building has its own requirements and set of  circumstances that makes it unique.  

 “Each building decides for itself what their pet rules are going to be, but there’s not a hard-and-fast set of rules by any stretch of the imagination,” says Barbara Fox, president of Fox Residential Group, a residential brokerage  located in Manhattan. “Every building is different, but I think the fewer restrictions a co-op or condo  puts on the tenant, the more people are likely to be attracted to the building.”  

 “One big benefit when you have people who have pets [living in your building] is  that pet owners are often very joyous, happy people,” says Linda Cohen Wassong, a broker with Prudential Douglas Elliman who often  matches luxury clients with pet-friendly buildings. “It’s always a benefit to have people who live in your building from all walks of  life and diversity.”  

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5 Comments

  • I chose a building that did not allow pets. I have allergies and would not purchase here if pets were allowed they bring a great deal of problems i.e. barking when the owner is at work and cleanliness issues I do not believe they raise the price of your apartment Glen Oaks has all private entrances and no one has to ride elevators with pets and very few people can hear barking as units are more individual than apartment building I think you should revisit your comments, as I believe pets are a huge drawback and I would not purchase in a building with pets The reason they were banned from so many buildings is due to the fact they were undersirable for many reasons and caused many problems.
  • Thank you for this in sightful article. Recently, I am beginning to be harassed by my co-op board about my dog because I recently began dog sitting for a neighbor's dog. This neighbor is not liked by the board because his apartment is rent controlled and they are trying to get him out. This article informs me of my rights as a dog owner in a co-op. Also, to the previous poster, a building being pet friendly is a plus and does raise the price of the units. I would know because I paid more for my apartment because it was in a complex that was pet friendly.
  • WHAT ABOUT CONDO PEOPLE WHO SAY THINGS ABOUT A DOG THAT ARE UNTRUE AND THE BOARD BELIEVES IT? WHERE IS THE PROOF? AND IF ONE OF THE BOARD MEMBERS HATES U FOR NOT BEDDING HIM, and bowing to his HONOR, where does a WOMAN LIVING ALONE TURN? IT'S SO UNFAIR THAT THE BOARD CAN USE THEIR ATTORNEY AND GO AFTER A UNIT OWNER WITH NO MORTGAGE ONLY ON HEARSAY!
  • There are so many coops for sale but over 50% are not pet friendly. Boards need to rethink the "no pet policy" You are losing out
  • What recourse do I have as a coop owner if the board has now decided to impose a pet fee when for years they looked the other way on their own "no pet policy"