Rye, New York: a Slice of Heaven Rollercoasters, Beaches and an Easy Commute

 This bucolic Westchester County community is home to the popular amusement park  Playland and its famous wooden roller coaster, the Dragon Coaster (remember  when Glenn Close and Ellen Latzen took a ride on this roller coaster in the  1987 thriller Fatal Attraction?). You’ll also find Rye Town Park; a stunning refuge nestled on a sixty-two acre  preserve on Long Island Sound that features gently rolling hills, an expansive  beachfront with a 34-acre swimming area, a naturalized duck pond and park paths  illuminated by old fashion street lights.  

 Even though Rye is home to Jarden, a Fortune 500 home equipment and furnishings’ company, Rye is primarily a place to live rather than make a living. One-third  of Rye’s working residents commute to New York City, a mere 25 miles away.  

 With its world class schools, family friendly atmosphere and miniscule crime  rate Coldwell Banker reported in 2010 that Rye was the third most expensive  city in the country to buy a home.  

 First Settlement

 According to the city’s history page, Rye, the oldest permanent settlement in Westchester County,  began in 1660 when Peter Disbrow, John Coe and Thomas Studwell migrated from  Greenwich with a small group of settlers. The following year they were joined  by John Budd, a puritan from Rye, England who played a major role in the naming  of the community.  

 The settlers’ first treaty with the Mohegan Indians gave them the land between Milton Point  and the Byram River (Peningoe Neck) then the mile-long Manussing Island. Within  several years the combined purchases of the settlers comprised all of what is  now the City of Rye, Town of Rye, Harrison, White Plains, North Castle,  Mamaroneck and parts of Greenwich.  

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