Organizations

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New York City Superintendents Technical Association

By Liam Cusack

It's been said that there is strength in numbers and there have long been organizations that strive to strengthen and clarify the roles of owners, residents, and managers in condos and co-ops. One vitally important professional—the superintendent—was the last to organize and gain representation. Today thanks to the work of the New York City Superintendents Technical Association (STA), the ones who keep the buildings running smoothly have a voice. Read More

Housing Development Fund Corporations

By Mary K. Fons

In order to get from one side of the Hudson River to the other, one would need to cross a bridge, get in a boat, or be able to jump a very long distance. Since not many people want to attempt the latter, most people utilize tools like bridges or some sturdy method of transportation when they want to get from Point A to Point B. Read More

SEIU Local 32BJ

By Hannah Fons

Going about the course of our busy lives we may take for granted the sense of safety and security we have when we enter our office building in the morning or our apartment building when we arrive home at night. We don’t think twice when someone signs for our FedEx package, keeps an important phone message for us or accepts our delivery from Fresh Direct. There are some very important service workers to thank for these conveniences. Read More

The Real Estate Board of New York (REBNY)

By Christy Smith-Sloman

 For most New Yorkers, the search for housing is perhaps the least favorite part  of the New York experience. If the size is right, the price is wrong; if the  price is right, the neighborhood’s wrong. And then there’s that hideous wallpaper in the hallway. In an area as popular and populous as  metropolitan New York, finding a unit that meets all your needs is darn near  impossible. The Real Estate Board of New York (REBNY) hopes to change all that. Read More

A Look at the Westchester CCAC

By Lisa Iannucci

 Westchester County was not always the affluent suburban landscape it is today.  The county evolved from its Native American roots into small population centers  and farms of the 17th and 18th centuries, growing into large urban centers, and  finally, the suburbs that symbolize 20th Century America. Read More

NYARM's School of Property Management

By Christy Smith-Sloman

 The New York Association of Realty Managers (NYARM) has been instrumental in  perfecting the skills of managers in the field with their School of Property  Management for nearly eight years, and in doing so, has helped numerous  veterans and newcomers alike to become certified accredited realty managers  (ARMs). Read More

The Manhattan Resident Manager's Club

By Christy Smith-Sloman

 Superintendents are a lot more than a repair person or someone to call at 3:00  a.m. if you suddenly find yourself without heat in the middle of a blustery  February night. Read More

Keeping It Cool

By Ann Connery Frantz

 Heating and cooling systems within co-op or condominium developments are called  upon to provide safe, consistent energy to residents. The people who bring you  heat, air cooling and refrigeration know that, and want to find what works—and what doesn’t—as technology evolve. They invest a good deal of time and effort into finding  and sharing the answers to this search and similar questions about their work.  What results are higher standards for buildings, better efficiency and safety  for all? Read More

The Insurance Information Institute

By Robert Greenberger

 It goes without saying that individuals and associations alike need to be  properly covered by insurance; that's just common sense. But the wide variety  of choices can make obtaining that coverage a daunting process. To help boards  and HOAs navigate these options with minimal hassle, the New York-based Insurance Information Institute (I.I.I.)  has become a one-stop-shopping resource for information on all manner of  insurance needs. Read More

A Concrete Solution in the Big Apple

By Jonathan Barnes

 Concrete is the most prevalent building material in existence today, though most  people probably don’t notice how widely used the material is until it begins to break up in front of  their homes, or falls off of their buildings, roads and bridges. Despite the  ubiquity of concrete, the questions of who has the expertise to do repairs on  concrete structures and how such repairs should be properly done weren’t being fully addressed even a few decades ago. Read More

National Association for Community Mediation

By Maggie Puniewska

 Unless you live in the perfectly utopian condo or co-op (in which case please  disclose where), conflict is virtually inevitable. Whether is it a noise  complaint or larger issue of governance, disputes between neighbors and board  members will arise yet are fortunately resolvable. However, because many  communities have a difficult time conciliating conflict, many residents and  boards are looking to outside mediation to help negotiate the problem more  effectively, with less dirty looks and cat fights involved. Organizations such  as the National Association for Community Mediation (NAFCM) and the Peace  Institute in Manhattan focus on promoting and utilizing specific resolution  strategies with trained professionals to help solve and mitigate conflicts not  only in condo and co-op communities, but also between family members, employees  and significant others. Read More

The National Fire Protection Association

By Emily Abbate

 Fire in the home can be an absolutely terrifying and life-altering occurrence.  In 2010 alone, there were 1,331,500 fires reported within the United States,  causing more than 3,000 civilian deaths, 17,720 injuries, and $11.6 billion in  damage. Within a matter of seconds, everything you treasure can be engulfed by  flames. And although we cannot prepare for life’s accidents, there is an organization that can educate us on how to avoid them. Read More

Inside SEIU Local 32BJ

By Hannah Fons

 If you feel safe entering your office or apartment building, see clearly outside  your apartment window to gaze at the New York City skyline or receive a package  of important papers on time, you have some very special service workers to  thank. They are the 120,000 doormen, building security guards, superintendents,  window cleaners, porters, custodians, and theater and stadium workers in New  York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and five other states along the East Coast. This  cohort of workers comes from more than 60 countries around the world and its  members speak nearly 30 different languages, but they are represented as a  single group by Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Local 32BJ, the  largest building service workers union in the country. Read More

NESEA and GreenHomeNYC

By Debra A. Estock

 The buzzword in energy today is “sustainability.” More than the installation of the sexiest new technology, sustainability is a  melding of renewable energy and energy efficiency. It’s a blend that forms the foundation of the Northeast Sustainable Energy  Association (NESEA).   Read More

The New York City Housing Court

By Liz Lent

 In a high-cost, high-density real estate landscape like New York City, when  disputes arise in a multifamily building, tensions can escalate from annoyance  to litigation very quickly. In rental buildings, problems can range from lack  of maintenance and upkeep to rent payment default or destruction of property.  In co-ops and condos, residents’ status as shareholders within a cooperative corporation or owners of real  property that just happens to be cheek-to-cheek with other property changes the  game a bit, but problems like noise and simmering disputes with neighbors are  perennial issues. Read More

The Bronx-Manhattan North Association of Realtors

By Lisa Iannucci

 Trade groups and professional organizations are an excellent illustration of the  old adage that “It’s not what you know, but who you know that makes the difference.” By joining trade organizations, professionals in any industry are afforded the  opportunity to not only network with peers for their own benefit, but also to  become an invaluable source of information and support to others. Read More

Making a Good Impression

By Hannah Fons

 They're the reason you feel safe entering your office or apartment building, the  reason you can see across all of New York City out a shiny Empire State  Building window, and the reason you receive that package of important papers on  time. They are the 100,000 doormen, building security guards, superintendents,  window cleaners, porters, custodians, and theater and stadium workers in New  York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and five other states along the east coast. This  cohort of workers comes from dozens of countries around the world and its  members speak nearly 30 different languages, but they are represented as a  single group by Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Local 32BJ, the  largest building service workers union in the country. Read More

A Concrete Solution

By Jonathan Barnes

 Concrete is the most prevalent building material in existence today, though most  people probably don’t notice how widely used the material is until it begins to break up in front of  their homes, or falls off of their buildings, roads and bridges. Despite the  ubiquity of concrete, the questions of who has the expertise to do repairs on  concrete structures and how such repairs should be properly done weren’t being fully addressed even a few decades ago.   Read More

A Look at the Attorney General's Office

By Keith Loria

Most New Yorkers are familiar with New York State Attorney General Andrew Cuomo, but how many people have heard the name Kenneth Demario before? If you’re someone concerned with co-ops, condos or any real estate issues in the city, Demario is someone you need to know. Read More

Recognition, Credibility and Certification

By Stephanie Mannino

With more and more people hanging out shingles as either interior design professionals—thanks partly to the popularity of television shows like Design on a Dime, Extreme Home Makeover and Trading Spaces—knowing who to hire for a job in your home or building can sometimes be a little tricky. Read More

The Department of City Planning

By Liz Lent

Imagine the biggest three-dimensional puzzle you can. Now imagine fitting eight million people into this puzzle. Putting the pieces together takes more than just luck. It takes enormous skill, precision and foresight. Those are three attributes that the New York City Department of City Planning (DCP) works hard to cultivate—it’s their job to put that puzzle together and ensure that the people, buildings and infrastructure of all five boroughs meld together as seamlessly as possible. It’s not a challenge for the faint of heart. Read More

Government on a Neighborly Basis

By Hannah Fons

New York City’s governing structure is complex for a metropolis of 8.2 million residents—it takes a lot of people in a lot of departments and organizations to keep the city running smoothly. Some of those people (the mayor, for instance) are household names, while others are perhaps less well known. The members of the city’s community boards may fall into the second category, but the work they do for the city is no less important for being done largely behind-the-scenes. Read More

No Typical Days Work

By Anthony Stoeckert

Ask Scott Stringer to describe a typical day in his job as Manhattan Borough President and he’ll answer that there’s no such thing—and that’s the way he likes it. Read More

Keeping History Alive

By Anthony Stoeckert

The Dakota. The San Remo. The Ansonia. Greenwich Village. Gramercy Park. DUMBO. New York City and its five boroughs are home to buildings and neighborhoods that are celebrities in their own right, and preserving the historic character and impact of those buildings is an important part of preserving the city's legacy for the future. One group wholly devoted to preserving (and sometimes improving) that legacy is the city's Landmarks Preservation Commission, the governing body responsible for designating neighborhoods and buildings as official historic landmarks. Read More

Neighbors Helping Neighbors

By Jonathan Barnes

Condominiums can provide all of the advantages of traditional homes, as well as affording other benefits such as recreational facilities, group activities and close proximity to shopping and other destination points. But the quasi-municipal nature of a condominium community means that elected representatives and property managers can have a myriad of issues to deal with in managing the neighborhood. This often amounts to amateurs dealing with decisions that a professional might handle better. Even among professional property management companies, some managers are more educated in the industry and more actively involved in their communities than others. Read More

The Real Estate Board of New York

By Lisa Buscani

For most New Yorkers, the search for housing is the least favorite part of the New York experience. If the size is right, the price is wrong; if the price is right, the neighborhood's wrong. And then there's that hideous bathtub in the kitchen. In an area as popular and populous as metropolitan New York, finding a unit that meets all your needs is darn near impossible. The Real Estate Board of New York (REBNY) hopes to change all that. Read More

The Federation

By Greg Olear

It's not exactly the United Federation of Planets of Star Trek lore, but The Federation of New York Housing Cooperatives and Condominiums (FNYHC) is an invaluable resource for members of the global housing cooperative and condominium community based in the New York City area. Read More

The New York City Tree Trust

By Greg Olear

Whether trees are categorically lovelier than poems, as Joyce Kilmer famously suggested, is a matter of debate. If pressed, I'll take Ode on a Grecian Urn over Charlie Brown's Yuletide entry any day of the week. New Yorkers will agree, however, that there is a certain magic present when, in the asphalt jungle that characterizes the groundscape in Gotham, a tree grows in Brooklyn—or, for that matter, in Manhattan, Queens, Staten Island or the Bronx. Read More

A Look at the NYSSCPA

By Liz Lent

As the oldest state accounting organization in the country, the New York State Society of Certified Public Accountants (NYSSCPA) holds an iconic place in the numbers realm. With 16 chapters spread out across the state, from the Adirondacks to Staten Island and of course, Manhattan, NYSSCPA has grown to 29,000 members over the course of its 110-year history. Read More

New York State Bar Association

By Greg Olear

With some 72,000 members, the New York State Bar Association (NYSBA) is the largest voluntary statewide association of lawyers in the country, and the official organization of legal practitioners in the state. Read More

A Look at the American Institute of Architects (AIA-NYC)

By Lisa Iannucci

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the American Institute of Architects' first (and largest) chapter—its New York Chapter, founded in 1857. Read More

A Champion of Ethics Wins The Cooperator's 1999 Award

By Diana Mosher

Every year The Cooperator recognizes individuals who have brought about positive change in the co-op and condo community. We're pleased to announce that P. Leonard ("Len") Jones, president of The New York Association of Realty Managers (NYARM), has been named winner of the 1999 Co-op and Condo Community's Man of the Year Award. Thanks to his commitment to promoting professionalism and ethics in co-op and condo management, residents can be assured that their property managers are meeting the toughest industry standards for ethics and moral behavior. Now is our chance to say thank you for his tremendous effort and determination. Keep up the good work! Read More

The Green Guerillas

By Mary K. Fons

Ralph Waldo Emerson once said, "The earth laughs in flowers." If that's the case, then the Green Guerillas are grinning from ear to ear. While some outreach programs spend a lot of their time working phones and crunching numbers to get work done, this New York-based organization has been brightening neighborhoods and spirits by getting their hands dirty - literally - for 30 years. The Green Guerillas, made up of over 800 volunteers, dozens of employees and generous donors, both corporate and private, have been changing the face of New York for decades using a different set of tools - vegetable seeds, flower pots, topsoil and mural paintings, just to name a few. Read More

The Fine Blue Line

By Mary K. Fons

When the Dutch settled in what was then called “New Amsterdam,” a man named Johann Lampo patrolled the trails and paths of the area, keeping the peace and watching for fires. Little did Lampo know that he was the first in a long, honored line of law enforcement officers of New York City. Read More

Darkness Comes to Life

By Debra A. Estock

In 1932, when Josephine Baldizzi was six, her mother Rosaria, used to bathe her in the kitchen’s slop sink in their five-story walkup tenement building at 97 Orchard Street. On her walk to school, she wore her father Adolfo’s size 9 shoes and hand-me down clothes. Rosaria tended to the household, and for a time worked long hours in the nearby garment factory. Adolfo was a cabinetmaker, who carried around a toolbox, and did odd jobs to support his family. Read More

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