Affordable Living in Chelsea A Look at Manhattan's Penn South Co-op

A casual passer-by on Eighth Avenue in Chelsea could easily pass a particular cluster of high-rises on the west side of the street and think they're just a group of typical Manhattan residential buildings.

But they're not. Mutual Redevelopment Houses Inc. - better known as Penn South - is more like a town within the city. Penn South has a uniformed security force, a staff of 110 employees, its own power plant (which enabled the development to have uninterrupted power during last year's blackout), a community garden, an exercise room, an extremely active seniors' program, a group of stores and restaurants on the premises, and even a theater or two.

Penn South was built as part of a wave of city- and state-subsidized co-op developments in the "˜60s, along with Starrett City, Co-op City, Rochdale Village and quite a few others. But it hasn't had the difficulties of, for instance, Co-op City, which had to close most of its garages because of structural problems. Penn South still remains an extremely desirable place to live for people looking for affordable housing - at one time the waiting list, which has been supplanted by an apartment lottery, was 15 years long.

And perhaps most remarkably, Penn South's shareholders have consistently voted against "going private," although if they gave themselves the right to sell their apartments on the open market, they certainly would be able to get very high prices for them. Instead, they've decided to give others the same opportunity for affordable middle-income housing that they had. By contrast, several other subsidized co-op developments did vote to go private, such as the Grand Street co-ops - which were built around the same time and designed by the same architect.

Penn South's decision shouldn't be surprising, because it is known for its political liberalism - one gets the feeling that the complex is a mini-Blue State unto itself. Many of the early residents were members of the ILGWU (International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union, the complex's original sponsor) and other unions. On the dais at the complex's opening ceremonies in 1962 were President John F. Kennedy, Eleanor Roosevelt and David Dubinsky, head of the ILGWU. As a matter of fact, Penn South (meaning "south of Penn Station") was known at first as the ILGWU Houses.

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18 Comments

  • I have been living in Penn South since 2002. I work and two meetings were made for Penn South's capital improvement project set to begin in July. My problem with these two crucial meetings is that I worked two shifts each and every time meetings were announced for this major capital improvement project. Management should have given the tenants unable to attend the option of obtaining a video or DVD for a fee to see the full scope and implications involved with this project. Does the tenant whose turn arrives to get their apartment cleared of old pipes and asbestos need to vacate for a week or more? What happens to the affected tenant without any relatives or friends nearby? Where does this kind of affected tenant go to in the midst of these huge challenges while the tenant needs to work? How will this affect me with my job? I feel numerous uncertainties and need certain answers with questions made here.
  • Francesca Ciolino-Volano on Wednesday, January 26, 2011 2:48 PM
    My mother worked as a dress operator and is still a member of the ILGWU. She receives a pension from the ILGWU. As her daughter, how can I get on a coop list or get any further information about doing so?
  • MaryAnn Bavuso Gray..dennisnme@yahoo.com on Thursday, June 16, 2011 5:16 PM
    My dad was a tailor in the garment district of ny city. he worked for the LIGWU from age 16 or 17 until he retired in 1977. he died soon after that. as his daughter would i be elegible to be placed on the co op list. my mom also worked as a seamstress for many yrs.
  • I dont know why I was singled out for an investigation into the coop being my primary residence. Although my job takes me on the road from time to time I am very much a primary resident as demonstrated by a great number of proofs I've submitted to our manager. I'v never subleted or had many guests. Why was I singled out when there are people on my floor who never show up? There are also others who spend much of their time in Florida and only come up for the summer months. Can someone help me.
  • Interested in finding out about getting on your l ist for a one or two bedroom apartment
  • My wife and I are approaching retirement age and are interested in finding out the requirements for applying for an apartment at Mutual Redevelopment Houses.
  • I looked at nine one bedrooms recently at One Penn and they were priced between $67-87,000. If you were interested, it was required to pay 50% of the equity as a downpayment just to get started. How does that make Penn South a "liberal" minded housing complex?
  • I would like information on getting on the waiting lists. Although the prices seem to have gone up.
  • i would like to retirer at penn south can i be put on the waiting listh
  • Why is Penn South liberal-minded even though apartments now cost $67,000? Because market value of those apartments in Chelsea is around a million dollars. Penn South apartments go for 10% or less of their market value and must be resold back to the co-op at that price. Waiting list is closed at 20,000+ people and has not been open for years. Being a garment worker or child of a garment worker has zero impact on getting on the list. If the list opens an ad will be put in the newsletter. Last time the list opened was about 15 years ago. It takes 15 to 20 years to be offered an apartment once on the list. You must be an NYC resident who earns a "middle income", not too low nor too high.
  • I would like to know how I can get on the waiting list for an apartment.
  • Prices are now up to at least $100,000 for a one bedroom apt.
  • I grew up at Penn South in building 7 and I long to move back. I wish my father had psssed it on to me as he had promised. if anyone can tell me how to get back on the list I would be greatly appreciative.
  • Why after several attempts with lottery number 2003-0000222H has my request to find out the status of my application and position on the waiting list been ignored? I have sent them in by mail and no response has been forthcoming. I find this to be terribly frustrating. Thank you.
  • What should I do to be put on the waiting list for Penn South studio?��brgds, Grace.
  • I would like to know the process of applying to get on the waiting list and how long is the wait per apartment size? Thank you.
  • Would like info on how to get on waiting list. My family's apartment was demolished in the late 50's to make room for these buildings.My parents were offered a chance to buy but declined at that time. Would love to go back!
  • The only long term solution to affordable housing: perpetual non-profit land trusts where the trusts own all the property and lease them out. Leases could be mixed, with some leased for 99 years renewable (with adjustments in the lease price) designed to be multi-generational. Other leases could be of varied shorter durations, but all renewable. Subsidizing the land trust would take a number of forms. One would be using 20% of the land for market rate apartment buildings. Another would be building up an endowment the way universities do, with an emphasis on taking donations from non-residents. Another would be higher but still reasonable rents for the shops and businesses operating on the land trust. P.S. The idea for the 99 year renewable lease came from my parents history. Both came from Catholic families with rare 99 year renewable leases, with all capital improvements owned by the tenant and sellable if the tenants decided to move out. Tenants with these leases under British law were given the status of owners when property ownership was required for voting. As a result of these leases, my parents electoral district, in an overwhelming Catholic country, was the only district with Catholics as the majority. My parents' families were able to innovate in how they farmed and grow prosperous even as tenant farmers.