From Park to Port A Look at Brooklyn's Community Board 6

Brooklyn's Community Board 6 - which covers Cobble Hill, Carroll Gardens, the Columbia Street District, Red Hook, Gowanus and Park Slope - may be one of the most diverse community boards in the city.

Its images range from fishermen and bicyclists enjoying the recently built Louis Valentino Jr. Pier and Park in Red Hook to a working containerport serving cargo ships; from sophisticated professionals drinking cappuccino on Park Slope's Seventh Avenue to the urban youth in the Red Hook housing projects; from the elaborate Christmas lights in the old Italian brownstone section of Carroll Gardens to young activists hoping to clean up the Gowanus Canal; from Middle Eastern bakeries selling baklava to swinging jazz bands at the Brooklyn Conservatory of Music.

At least into the 1960s, the areas within Community Board 6 were all known as South Brooklyn - and some old-timers still use the term. Why "South Brooklyn" when there are other parts of Brooklyn - such as Flatbush and Coney Island - that are actually much further south? For most of the 19th century, Flatbush, Gravesend and so on were separate towns, and "South Brooklyn" meant the southern part of what was then the city of Brooklyn.

Basically speaking, Brooklyn Community Board 6's boundaries are the East River, Upper New York Bay, the Gowanus Canal, 15th Street, Prospect Park West, Flatbush Avenue, Pacific Street, Fourth Avenue, Warren Street, Court Street and Atlantic Avenue.

According to the statistical profile contained on the board's website (www.brooklyncb6.org), the area was home to some 104,054 people as of the 2000 census. Of them, 54.5 percent are white, 23.4 percent, Hispanic and 15.9 percent, African-American. The largest population groups fall into 25 to 44 and 45 to 64 age brackets. Seventy-two percent of the households are renters; 27.4 percent, owners. Median household income levels vary wildly by census tract, from $10,372 all the way up to $112,414.

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