NYARM's School of Property Management Raising the Bar for Management Pros

The New York Association of Realty Managers (NYARM) has been instrumental in perfecting the skills of managers in the field with their School of Property Management for nearly eight years, and in doing so, has helped numerous veterans and newcomers alike to become certified accredited realty managers (ARMs).

The School of Property Management was established in 2004 by Margie Russell, NYARM’s executive director, as a venue for professionals already working in the property management field as opposed to similar programs at New York University (NYU), the Real Estate Education Center (REEDC), and Baruch’s Steven L. Newman’s Real Estate Institute, which focus more on those just entering the profession. The New York City Department of Housing Preservation & Development (HPD) also offers public outreach and education courses for owners, tenants and property managers.

Reaching thousands, NYARM is dedicated to raising the standard of excellence for the real estate and property management profession through education, information, legislative initiatives and a peer network that makes NYARM the benchmark for technological advancement and career enhancement, says Russell.

“We serve multi-family building managers who are employed or experienced in the field,” says Russell. “We are not a trade school teaching entry level property management to individuals looking to become employed in the industry.”

Becoming Certified

NYARM offers a property management certification known as the “N.Y. Accredited Realty Manager” or (NYARM), that is recognized by both New York City and New York State where required. The certification process is one of gathering knowledge in various disciplines identifying core areas of the job at hand. Certification credit can be earned for work experience and prior education. Program length is adjusted based on the individual applicant, so certification could take anywhere from six to 40 weeks.

Management by Ethics explores pertinent ethical issues and gives participants the blueprint they need to evaluate situations and make sound ethical decisions, Management by Finance tackles the fundamentals of financial management where students learn to read and interpret monthly and annual balance sheets and financial reports for multifamily and commercial buildings and Management by Budget which delves into expenditure budgeting with an emphasis on fixed costs and variable costs, are a sampling of the course offerings.

Additional classes include Management by The Law which concentrates on contract law for construction and services as well as Landlord and Tenant Law, and Management by People Skills emphasizes tenant/owner and occupant relations while also dealing with managing and supervising employees.

And lastly, the Management by Compliance course examines local laws and administrative codes that apply to building envelopes, exterior, mechanical and interior systems. “Course plans are customized to the background and experience of the individual,” says Russell.

The courses were created with the intention of advancing the careers of assistant managers, sharpening the skills of property managers and developing management skills for building engineers and superintendents, she says.

“The needs of those who want to progress in the field are much different than that who want to enter it,” says Russell, “So we devised a way to get right to the heart of issues presently on the desk of the management professional.”

The school strives to present the true life experience of the instructors who have worked in the field while breaking the lessons down to the microcosm of daily management. The class sizes allow a maximum of 15 people, which makes for an intimate environment for all.

“Some of the course work is completed at NYARM, and for certain subjects we refer the applicant to other organizations, who specialize in a specific discipline,” says Russell.

The founding of the NYARM program marks the first time students can take classes at the same place they receive certification. The school is an educational venue supported entirely on its own by the people who attend it, as well as the certification program.

NYARM also sponsors social events like golf outings and monthly seminars. Next up is a networking breakfast and certification seminar on November 14 on the ground floor library pavilion at the General Society of Mechanics & Tradesmen in Midtown.

The organization also sponsors an annual real estate expo in September that features exhibitors and a host of educational seminars that draws over 1,000 attendees.

Ethical Requirements

A strong sense of ethics is at the core of NYARM and every student is required to take an ethics course. The organization has its own Code of Ethics which illustrates its dedication to raising standards for real estate professionals. NYARM believes that the professional real estate manager must zealously maintain the integrity of the industry and its members.

“Every course has the ethical component woven throughout,” says Russell. “It is an essential aspect of what we do as professionals, and we teach the ethical and moral way with diligence.”

After managing properties in the New York City co-op and condo market for 18 years, Russell is excited about the future of NYARM.

“A property manager or management company would want to become a NYARM member because of the quality of the continuing education at the monthly programs which are both timely and infused with the sensibility of how to develop good business judgment and make sound decisions, no matter what the topic,” says Russell. “When managers attend these monthly programs they conveniently maintain their continuing credits for certification. Those providing services and goods to the buildings should also want to join as an Associate Member for networking and to learn, beyond their particular scope of interest, the issues concerning their building clients.”

For more information log onto NYARM’s website www.nyarm.org or email mrussell@nyarm.org. NYARM can also be reached at (212) 216-0654.

Christy Smith-Sloman is a staff writer for The Cooperator and other publications.

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Comments

  • HI, I'm a resident manger in Forest Hills, I just went through an intense C.E.R.T. or community response team training program, i was certified. I'm interested in getting the certification for NYARM